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7th EuroELSO Congress on ECMO-ECLS

May 23 - 26 | 2018 | Prague | Czech Republic

REGISTRATION
Registration is now open!

CALL FOR ABSTRACTS
Call for Abstracts is now open!

Social Events

Get Together Drink

Venue

Prague Congress Centre, Exhibition area
5. května 65, Prague 4

Date

May 24, 2018, 13:00

Price

Included in the registration fee


Gala Dinner

Venue

Žofín Palace
Slovanský ostrov 8, Prague 1

Date

May 24, 2018, 20:00 – 24:00

Price

90 EUR

Programme

Havelka´s Sisters (swing music of the 20ties), dulcimer music, buffet style dinner

Dress Code

Semi-formal


Full buffet style dinner with drinks

How to Register

Fill in the Online Registration Form



The neorenaissance Žofín Palace is one of the most notable architectural treasures. Žofín Palace is used for important social events, conferences, concerts and balls. The Large Hall at Žofín regularly hosts the most prominent personalities from business, politics and the arts in this country and abroad.

In 1835, when Václav Novotný decided to build the first brick building on Slavonic Island (or Dyers’ Island as it was then called), he had no idea that the one-storey neoclassical building named after the mother of Emperor Franz Joseph I, Princess Sophie (or Žofie in Czech), would become one of the most important cultural and social centres in Prague and the Czech Lands as a whole.
In 1884 the municipality bought the whole island, including Žofín, and over the next two years it converted the building into the present neorenaissance palace with richly decorated interiors and fine halls that have now been part of Czech (and not only Czech) culture for the last 150 years. On November 5, 1882 the first erformance of Smetana’s My Country in its entirety took place at Žofín, and four years previously, on 17 November 1878, Antonín Dvořák had held his first concert here. The hall at Žofín also hosted performances of Zdeněk Fibich’s works; Berlioz, Liszt, Tchaikovsky and Wagner all appeared here, and Jan Kubelík made his debut here.
Žofín was also a venue for balls and dances. The first was held on February 3 ,1841 and two years later the writer Božena Němcová danced here, and Žofín was visited by the poet Jan Neruda and other figures from Czech history. Since 1994, when the renovation of the palace’s exteriors and interiors was completed, Žofín has been managed by Agentura NKL Žofín, s.r.o. The company has restored and added to the glory of this exceptional venue where concerts of classical and popular music alternate with the Žofín Forums, international conferences and wonderful balls. Its location, in a venerable park with a view over Prague’s historical panorama, and the magnificent and gloriously decorated halls with original paintings and stuccowork on the ceilings, fitted with modern lighting, sound and projection technology and air conditioning, once more offer unique opportunities and experience.


Cimbal music of Alexander Vrábel

The dulcimer band of Alexandr Vrábel presents one of the basic lines of Czech and Moravian folklore. It performs with a line-up of the most common of folk instruments - the hammer dulcimer, and the repertoire includes Czech, Moravian, Slovak and Gypsy folk melodies as well as well-known songs from other countries (Santa Lucia, Rosamunde)
Composition: hammer dulcimer,1st violin, contrabass, viola, voice




Havelka Sisters & Havelka Sisters Orchestra

Havelka Sisters & Havelka Sisters Orchestra is an ensemble of eleven enthusiastic musicians who have all succumbed to early swing’s. For many years, they have been walking their audiences through the period between the wars, a period filled with rhythm, dance, inspiration, pure ideals, and romantic loves and dreams. The ensemble is composed of a ladies’ vocal trio – Petra Kohoutová, Olga Bímova, and Anna Vávrová, and an eight-member orchestra: piano, tenor saxophone, alt saxophone, trumpet, violinophone, guitar, percussion, and bass.
Havelka Sisters & Havelka Sisters Band’s efforts to preserve the purest style are not only focused on the interpretation and instrumentation of Czech, American and German songs of the 1930s; they encompass the entire stage performance, ranging from the speaker’s accompanying comments to period costumes and expression.





Social Evening with an exhibition visit of Man-Made Man: Technology and Medicine

Venue

Národní technické muzeum
Kostelní 42, Prague 7

Date

May 25, 2018, 20:00 – 23:00

Price

60 EUR

Transportation

Bus transfer from/to Congress venue

Dress Code

Casual


Full buffet style dinner with drinks

How to Register

Fill in the Online Registration Form


National Technical Museum in Prague, established in 1908. For over a hundred years extensive collections have been assembled here documenting the development of many technical fields, of the natural and exact sciences, and of industry in the territory of today’s Czech Republic.


Man-Made Man: Technology and Medicine

The exhibition introduces the visitor not only to the history and the present of prosthetics as a specific field, but also to the use of technological substitutes across all fields of medicine. It uncovers ample collaboration of experts in medicine, electronics, cybernetics, mechanics, statics, design, and other fields, which precedes the development of unique prostheses and makes it possible.

From limb prostheses and dental implants to replacements of kidney, liver, heart, or lung function to nerve stimulation or compensation of voice, hearing, and vision, the Man-made Man exhibition shows the possibilities, perspectives, as well as limitations of replacements within the human body.

The image of technological replacement, reinforcement and multiplication of everything that belongs to man as a material being has perhaps become the central metaphor of the human existence of the 20th and 21st centuries. Technology is supposed to overcome the limitations imposed on humans by their physicality and mortality: telephones, television and the internet allow people to see and hear where their physical senses do not reach; machines augment the strength of human muscles thousandfold; computers amplify, accelerate, and replace the power of memory and thought. As Sigmund Freud wrote in Civilization and Its Discontents: “Now [man] has himself approached very near to realizing this [divine] ideal, he has nearly become a god himself. […] Not completely, in some respects not at all, in others only by halves. Man has become a god by means of artificial limbs, so to speak, quite magnificent when equipped with all his accessory organs; but they do not grow on him and they still give him trouble at times.”